My Story: Princess Sophia Duleep Singh

£6.99

Princess Sophia Duleep Singh is aware of her special place in British society. After all, her godmother is Queen Victoria. Then again, her father, the Maharaja Ranjit Singh is good friends with the Queen’s son and heir Uncle Albert. In fact, until he was snatched away, to be raised as an Englishman, at the age of eight, her father was the heir to the the kingdom of Punjab.

However, it seems that as Sophia grows older, after her family are returned from Aden, after travelling to India to the land of their father, divisions grow within her family. While her eldest brother seeks to become an Englishman, it seems her elder sister and mentor, Bamba, seeks to know her true identity and place in the world. So, what of Sophia? After a while, the appeal of a  life of comfort and dogs and horses dwindles. What will happen when she makes the acquaintance of Emmeline Pankhurst? Then again, how will Sophia react when she understands what really happened to her father, and how he sought to make a difference to those who were less privileged?

Bookwagon is inspired by My Story: Princess Sophia Duleep Singh. Sufiya Ahmed’s research has created a realistic, engaging, first person historical narrative. We realise the unfairness of Sophia’s family’s history, alongside that of the constrained treatment of women. Then again, we are engaged by the expectation of the Empire, when it comes to WWI and the disrespect shown those unfairly conscripted into service.

We recommend this story unequivocally. Princess Sophia’s story needs to be known and shared. We recommend My Story: Princess Sophia Duleep Singh to our readers.

Add to Wishlist
Add to Wishlist

Description

My Story: Princess Sophia Duleep Singh

Sufiya Ahmed

(Scholastic)

My Story: Princess Sophia Duleep Singh is a first person, narrative biography from Sufiya Ahmed. It seems her subject is one she introduces to school children, like My Story: Noor-Un-Nissa Inayat Khan. As with that figure, the princess’s early life did not indicate her future. In fact Sophia’s place, as one of Queen Victoria’s godchildren, marked her out for privilege and comforts.
However, Sophia’s father, the Maharaja Ranjit Singh, had been stolen from his ancestral land as a boy. It seems that raising the heir to the ‘great Sikh kingdom of Punjab‘ as an Englishman was a way to ensure Empirical command of the region. What’s more, it confirmed the kingdom’s riches as Britain’s. These included the great Koh-i-noor diamond.
Therefore, how did such a conventional start in life, in the English countryside, inspire a leading suffragette? Through her careful research and realistic interpretation, Sufiya Ahmed, explains Sophia’s influences. It seems that her siblings were torn by their different origins and history, like their father and mother. What’s more, Sofia’s sister Bamba, renounced her Christian, English upbringing, to rediscover the family’s Punjab heritage.
Then again, the author makes us consider other issues. For example, we realise the unequal treatment and expectation of South Asian forces in service. Then again, we read of the lascars, those in marine service. What’s more, again, we read of the disrespect shown when Sofia’s brother married into the English aristocracy. Altogether, My Story: Princess Sophia Duleep Singh is a fascinating history that we recommend highly.

 

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “My Story: Princess Sophia Duleep Singh”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may also like…