A time to read

A time to read

A time to read

Bookwagon was formed to celebrate, share and sell children’s books we’ve read and love. We aim to support a wide range of writers and illustrators. Increasingly, we do this at popup events at schools and special events. In fact, we were in the fortunate position of being booked until and including World Book Day 2021. We began to breathe out a little. Then the Covid- 19 crisis knocked the wheels off our trolley, as it bulldozed its way into society.

Sharing books (C) Bookwagon

Sharing books

So, Bookwagon is working from base. We have time to read our To Be Read piles and add books we’ve read to the site. Finally, it’s meant I’ve time to write a blog! While we’re somewhat confined to base with wonderful books to share and new titles ahead, we aim to support families and schools

Family reading (C) Bookwagon

Family reading sharing

What you know

Bookwagon curates, shares and shows children’s books during our popup visits.

Always, our goal is to build upon the fine work of families and teachers with whom we engage. These  are readers who love and share children’s books. They want children to realise that little is as precious as taking the time to read. Nobody who wants to build or be a reader needs anything other than a model and enthusiast.

Sharing books (C) Bookwagon

Sharing books

What you need to know

During the current crisis Bookwagon will share titles we want you to know about on social media. Please excuse the nerves – it’s always much better with children, live! There will be an individual title featured each day.

Personal recommendations (C) Bookwagon

 A personal recommendation

Furthermore Bookwagon will offer a code:- springbooks with 20% discount on the price of any book, other than subscriptions or offer titles. This discount is available until March 26th.

There is a separate discount code of 20%:- springbundle – offered for our Book Bundle. Here, customers are invited to subscribe to up to 12 titles. Take a look at the details. This discount will be available until midnight on March 26th, also.

New picture books (C) Bookwagon

Picture book selection

Spring blossoming

Covid-19 virus is impacting on all our lives, society and the economy. As I write schools face enormous pressures, particularly.  I’m concerned that writers and illustrators, who depend on the income from school visits to take a living wage, will be particularly adversely affected. Certainly, Bookwagon is worried about our future.

Kate Scott and reader (C) Bookwagon

Kate Scott and reader

There are so many writers and illustrators with new books arriving around this time about which we want you to know. Additionally, there are books that you may have missed, that we are keen to share with you. So watch our social media pages, to see what’s available, what we’ve read and what’s popping up on our latest titles. Don’t forget to scroll through our yellow tag cloud to discover books to suit your reader also. We’re updating constantly.

March releases (C) Bookwagon

Recently released fiction paperbacks

Meanwhile, our best thoughts are with you and your readers of all ages.

Happy reading. 

Welcome to a reading school

Welcome to a reading school

This is a reading school

 ‘This is a reading school’ are words that cheer our hearts. While we realise such a declaration is mandatory,  it suggests determination. Yet what is a reading school?

I am reluctant to comment or advise about the reading schemes and methods employed by schools publicly after three years away from teaching full-time. I share my experience and training when asked. However I know what makes a reading school.

Bookwagon popup book fair (c.) Bookwagon reading school

Curated and waiting popup book stand

Preparing to meet the reading school

Bookwagon creates our popup book fairs meticulously. We are still making a final selection, considering the best matches for the school we are visiting, right up until the evening ahead of the visit. I peruse all the information I have amassed. No two popup book fairs are identical.

Recently we had a run of five across a week in four different counties. We curated our lists specifically for each setting. We have a good idea of the likely outcome of a visit from the interactions with the school before we arrive. Having a contact who is proactive, enquiring and excited about our visit guarantees a Bookwagon popup book fair will be a hit! We will be visiting a reading school.

Bookwagon popup book fair preparation (c.) Bookwagon

Setting up a school popup book fair

Schemes and expectations

We do not create a popup book fair to support a school’s reading program because reading for pleasure doesn’t work that way for any one. A packaged measuring scheme or reading journey record, neither creates nor maintains a reading habit. Bookwagon supports the good work families and schools do to build readers for life. Reading schools build readers for life.

Bedtime reading (C) Bookwagon reading school

              Bedtime reading 

 

How do families build readers for life?

Parents build readers for life through demonstrating their own need to read. They have a reading habit, and show that reading satisfies and informs their lives. They model reading every day. There is a family bedtime reading routine that everyone enjoys. Library visits are commonplace. Books are gifted, discussed, compared, enjoyed, and treasured.

Bookwagon family reading blog (c) Bookwagon

              Bedtime shared reading 

How do schools build readers for life?

Schools build readers for life with teachers who demonstrate their need to read. Staff model reading every day. Book shelves are kept in good order, with titles updated, displayed, discussed, reviewed while old titles are replaced or discarded. The school values its library. Staff seek to know what children like reading. They seek to extend experience and understanding. Reading is celebrated. Books are discussed, compared, enjoyed and treasured. Personal, recreational, unevaluated reading time is part of the daily timetable.

Talking about books with Emily Hughes

Emily Hughes, school visit

The library in the reading school

Reading schools ask our advice about their library stock. Bookwagon reads every book it sells, which means we can offer confident recommendations about titles, genres, collections. Furthermore, our experience means we know what works, i.e., which books and writers can go with others, to encourage a reading for life habit.

Bookwagon popup book fair with teachers (C.) Bookwagon blog reading schools

Teachers visiting a recent popup

Recently, we have been asked for guidance by four schools seeking to establish and extend their school library. While one school sought a particular genre, another sought titles for a particular key stage. The other two requested suggestions as to long term development. Two of the schools have enrolled with our School Orders subscription service, developed to support schools’ specific reading needs.

Our experience

Bookwagon is about to hit the road anew with popup book fairs across London and the Home Counties until the end of the year. We pick up the pace in the spring anew. We hope to meet reading schools such as the last setting we had the pleasure to experience.

This  primary school included ‘Drop Everything and Read‘ in its daily timetable for everyone on site. Books were thoughtfully displayed at child friendly heights and accessible front covers. Thereafter, titles, authors and genres were labelled clearly. We did not see battered, abandoned books. It seemed like the school library was the active heart of the school.

Sharing books in a reading school (c.) Bookwagon

Sharing books at a recent school popup 

The staff

Staff visited our popup and asked us about our book selections. Furthermore, they made suggestions and shared their experiences. They encouraged visitors, directing them toward choices they thought they would enjoy. Staff demonstrated their interest through browsing, asking our opinions, and being seen to buy our books. The Headteacher and senior staff engaged with us throughout our visit. This reading school showed that reading for pleasure, with the opportunity to extend reading range and experience, is essential.

Bookwagon (c.) reading teacher reading school

Reading teacher, ‘I Am a Tiger

The students

The students at this school enquired about our books. We read everything we sell, which meant that we could talk about our books and make informed decisions. Even KS1 children listened, asked questions and made choices based around what they heard and saw. Many children shared their opinions and experiences, and their reading selections proved wide and varied. We sold out of picture books. At no point did any visitor to our popup book fair suggest that they were ‘too old for picture books’. This reading school respects the value of every genre.

Picture books for all ages, Chris Naylor- Ballesteros (c.) Bookwagon

         Picture books, Chris Naylor-Ballesteros

Our conclusion

The school did not raise its reading program with Mr Bookwagon and me for this was irrelevant. However we know that this school is a reading school from our experience of the school’s practice in building readers for life. Bookwagon feels privileged to have been part of that initiative.

A reader for life (c.) Bookwagon

The reader for life

We hope your school is a reading school!

Happy reading!

The value of being small

The value of being small

Bookwagon hopes you have made a happy return to the new academic year. This annual marker affects everyone in the community, from hairdresser to long-distance lorry driver. However, the biggest, most lasting effect of the start of a school year is upon the school goer. These first days are daunting especially for the very young. There is such pressure in being small within a big new world.

Assuming new people, routines and settings in new places is stressful. Furthermore it is demanding for families. There is a comfort in returning to the familiar at the end of a working day, with food, chat, bed, bath and books. Bookwagon seeks to be part of your daily routine with books we’ve read and love and recommend to you. Happy new school year.

Bookwagon (C) End of school day

At the end of a school day

In the meantime…

Bookwagon has refined its appearance and products, while the world enjoyed its summer holiday. We are proud of our new look and opportunities. There is a variety of subscription packages, including Book Bundle and a Birthday list service. 

The first enables a customer to buy a bunch of books for a reader, maybe a series, or a selection created from the information you provide. It’s an especially great choice for the reading devotee, as a gift, or for a specific period of time.

The second, the Birthday list service, was inspired by a regular customer requesting gift books for her daughters’ friends’ parties. What if you could preorder a number of gift books, advising us of recipients’ essential details ahead of their celebration? Bookwagon chooses the book, gift wraps and writes your birthday message before posting the selection. What is better than the gift of a book?

Birthday gift list (C) Bookwagon

A message from Bookwagon

Bookwagon offers a bespoke service. Being small means we can assist our customers personally, using our knowledge of our children’s books to suit specific individual needs.

Joanna Grochowicz

It means we can get to know our writers too. Recently we met with acclaimed non-fiction narrative writer, Joanna Grochowicz. After failing to find biographies about the polar explorers to fulfil her sons’ interest, this writer created her own. Extensive research and commitment culminated in Into the White: Scott’s Antarctic Odyssey and Amundsen’s Way: The Race to the South Pole. Ernest Shackleton’s polar adventure will feature in a third title.

Bookwagon (C) Joanna Grochowicz

Joanna Grochowicz, London, September 2019

 

Bookwagon (C) Into the White and Amundsen's Way

Into the White and Amundsen’s Way

We are proud to be Joanna’s on site bookseller during her schools’ tour in November, and then again in December. Moreover, her first visits coincide with National Non-Fiction November. Imagine stepping inside an historic figure’s (snow) shoes, ‘feeling’ their determination, fears, hopes and experience. Joanna’s books are stirring, informative and important.

More small

I have learned to drown out the clamour of  bigger booksellers despite feeling intimidated by their reach. Reading every book we sell means we are  less inclined to rush to a new release likely to be splashed across the chain stores. Being small means Bookwagon may champion titles and writers lesser known but meriting a wide readership. We recommend books through our experience of them, with authority.

During the summer I enjoyed reading Gabrielle Kent’s Penfurzy set adventure series- Knights and Bikes and Knights and Bikes Rebel Bicycle Club. The first was an introductory selection for small startup Brixton publisher ‘Knights Of…

Bookwagon (C) Knights and Bikes series

Knights and Bikes’ series

I could hear the Cornish accented Demelza, and smell the oil of the bike chains. What a great adventure series, with crafty Arthurian links!

Small, bubbly, smelly and communicative

On Thursday, the third title in Jennifer Killick’s ‘Alex Sparrow’ series is released. I read these titles backwards, i.e., I read and loved Mo, Lottie and the Junkers ahead of Jennifer’s Alex series. As our gift book subscribers can attest, I love that first title SO much and recommend it hugely. The beauty of being an independent children’s bookseller is that I am able to read our books in the order I choose; I’m not being driven by the market or a publicist.

‘Mo, Lottie and the Junkers’ inspired me to read both ‘Alex Sparrow’ titles on the trot. What a treat! If your reader enjoys books with dialogue, humour, rather annoying main characters, flaws, the unexpected, quirky humour, coincidence and pratfalls, please don’t overlook Jennifer Killick’s titles. Roll on in ‘Alex Sparrow and the Zombie Apocalypse’!

 

Bookwagon (C) Jennifer Killick titles

   Titles by Jennifer Killick

Small publishing houses

Many of of Bookwagon’s favourite titles have emerged from smaller, bespoke publishing houses. These appear to have a vested interest in discovering and nurturing quality writers and picture book makers.

However smaller publishing houses have cautious print runs, through necessity. Furthermore, they do not have the big marketing budgets of large international publishing houses, nor the network for global sales. This means writers and picture book makers are at the mercy of booksellers and a reading public. What a responsibility!

New books (C) Bookwagon

       A Bookwagon gift book

It can be frustrating to be a reading bookseller, championing wonderful writers. So often publicity is attached to known writers or picture book makers, reprised titles, or the quick thrill of a debut. It’s why we read every book we sell, so that we can urge readers toward books and writers and picture books we know you’ll enjoy.

What it means

Being small and independent offers this bookseller opportunities to read and sell international titles like Felicita Sala’s Lunch at 10 Pomegranate Street, created in France, or Australian Aaron Blabey’s riotous The Bad Guys. We  cheer the arrival of Uncle Shawn and Bill and the Not One Tiny Bit Lovey-Dovey Moon Adventure the third title in A.L.Kennedy (yes, that one) and Gemma Correll’s bizarre, hilarious series, celebrating kindness and individuality.

10 Pomegranate Street and Children Who Changed the World (C) Bookwagon

Bookwagon new titles

Being small can be powerful, as Clementine shows, in picture book maker Chris Wormell’s astounding graphic story, The Magic Place

Small is powerful in real life. Mr Bookwagon and I were both brought to tears reading the true stories selected for Children Who Changed the World. As I write another small, strong girl protests outside the White House; Greta’s Story

New chapter book titles from Bookwagon

    A new Bookwagon chapter book selection

On the road

Being small means that when Bookwagon is called to popup in schools throughout London and the Home Counties, we curate each event specifically. We work to create book fair selections that captivate, win and challenge readers. It’s a demanding order, but one we love!

Therefore

There is value in being small, starting small, but reading large and widely. We look forward to sharing a depth and breadth of wonderful reading opportunities throughout the new season and beyond. We can’t wait!

Happy reading!

 

 

 

 

 

What does it mean?

What does it mean?

Looking for meaning

The range and wealth of children’s poetry has been a delightful discovery for me. Since starting Bookwagon, I have sought to read and expand my knowledge of children’s poetry.

Poets are looking for meaning in their creations. The tweezer picked perfection and impact of their words create images and stimulate feelings. Poetry is a most accessible genre to children and adults. It offers children a chance to understand, word play, recall, recite and build a word relationship.

I found teaching poetry a direct, structured, liberating form of writing. Poetry invites us to write and read for meaning.

Kowhai New Zealand

Young New Zealand poet Isabel Carmichael had been asked to consider the impression of war on a setting, when her class learned about Gallipoli:-

In one minute’s silence…..
Can you imagine the firing of the guns as the sky turns black from the bullets?
In one minute’s silence…..
Can you imagine people having a good day,
When suddenly people with guns come running onto the shore?
In one minute’s silence……
Can you imagine all of the diggers shooting at all of the other soldiers,
When they know that they are just as important as them?
In one minute’s silence……
Can you imagine all of the dead bodies lying on the floor from being shot…..
In one minute’s silence.

Piha West Coast beaches Bookwagon

CLiPPA prize

Bookwagon loves, recommends and sells this year’s CLiPPA poetry prize nominations’ list proudly.

Thinker My Puppy Poet and Me is an empathetic poetry diary between a new puppy and his boy master. They are looking for meaning in their relationship with each other and the world.

Dark Sky Park by Philip Gross is rare and tender and beautiful, recommended to nature loving families.

A Kid in My Class is essential school fare. Rachel Rooney’s dedicated examination of a classroom of children is raw, empathetic and recognisable.

School is the setting for Everything All At Once by Steven Camden. We travel through secondary school doors with an assembly of characters, keen to fit in, experience, not stand out, be themselves… if they knew who that might be. They are looking for meaning in alien worlds of adolescence and education.

CLiPPA books Bookwagon

A selection of CLiPPA nominees

Oxford Spires Academy

Oxford Spires Academy has won more poetry awards nationally, than any other title. Writer in residence, Kate Clanchy has compiled a selection of this school’s poems in an outstanding collection, England Poems from a School

Students speak more than thirty languages with more than fifty dialects. Yet there impressions of home, growing up, England and their future resonate with truth, longing and hope.

Rainbow over Oxfordshire fields Bookwagon

    Rainbow over fields of barley, Oxfordshire

The meaning of words- Geordie style

My Geordie mother-in-law enjoyed opportunities to recall traditional words and phrases from South Shields. ‘Wey aye ‘man!’ as she agreed with something, ‘cannae’ offered in a stream of conversation for ‘can not’. Reminiscing about wartime dance floors, she would occasionally consider a ‘Bobby Dazzler’, or a ‘bonnie lass/ lad’ or her ‘marra’, Doris. Cheryl (Tweedy/ Cole/ Versini-Fernandez) delighted Helen, until she disappointed her. ‘I think she’s gotten above her station. She’s not a Geordie lass.’

Geordie lass and language

Geordie lass and lingo

The meaning of words- Kiwi speak

Mr Bookwagon is beginning to understand the New Zealand art of understatement.  A family member texted him after Watford F.C’s devastating loss in the FA Cup final- ‘No words mate’.

Nouns that tangle me still, include:-

  • cling film- Glad Wrap (New Zealand)
  • flip flops- jandals (New Zealand)
  • tacky back plastic- contact (New Zealand)
  • newsagent/ corner shop- dairy (New Zealand)
  • Tippex- Twink (New Zealand)
  • lolly- iceblock (New Zealand)
  • plasters- Band Aids (New Zealand)
  • kiwi*- kiwifruit (New Zealand) * – This one makes me very cross! A kiwi is our native New Zealand bird, and/ or a native New Zealander, not a hairy fruit.
Iceblock eater Bookwagon

      Iceblock eating Kiwi

What writers do

Emma Carroll, best-selling, award-winning children’s writer explained  Operation Mincemeat to a recent school audience. She explained its initiative and how this event in WWII developed into a story within When We Were Warriors. Emma shared how she is looking for meaning in her research and storytelling. Her research allows her to ‘be who she wanted to be’ and ‘create the stories she wanted’.

Asked for a top tip when writing, she advised, ‘Lose the adjectives. Give the words a chance to make a story.

Emma Carroll signing

Emma Carroll school visit

Kate DiCamillo- and how we read for meaning

  Walker, Kate DiCamillo

Kate DiCamillo’s books are deceptively simple. Yet her words are laden with poignant meaning. We seek meaning in the context and our innate understanding to assume nuance, impulse and setting. Deckawoo Drive, her early chapter book series including Leroy Ninker Saddles Up, offers complex words and feelings.

Leroy Ninker lives a small life. His dreams of being a cowboy sustain him.

‘ A car drove by Look, Mama!’ a boy in the backseat of the car pointed at Leroy. ‘It’s a very tiny cowboy.’

Leroy stood up straighter.

‘I am a cowboy on his way to procure a horse,’ he said. ‘I am a man wrestling fate to the ground.’ 

Fate appears to conspire against Leroy, yet he does not buckle.

Bookwagon Leroy Ninker Saddles Up

Leroy Ninker Saddles Up, Kate DiCamillo & Chris Van Dusen

Early chapter books

Bookwagon has hit the trail with a succession of author visits and popup book fairs recent weeks. I have spoken about children’s literature, also .

Bookwagon on tour

Bookwagon popup fair

Frequently, we are asked for recommendations about early chapter books, titles to bridge picture books and middle grade readers.

Bookwagon asserts picture books’ relevance to readers of all ages. Picture books offer an incomparably varied opportunity to readers looking for meaning. We are looking for meaning in the pictures of our daily lives; from babies, physical health, DIY, gardening, internet shopping, home interiors, to photographs. They are part and parcel of how we understand.

Early chapter books are a landing stage, however. To that end, Bookwagon has been working to extend our  selection of ‘forever’ early chapter books, titles where the stories are interesting and meaningful.

Bookwagon early chapter books

A selection of early chapter books

Don’t forget

We invite readers to click on our tag cloud to discover a unique selection. Remember! Every Bookwagon book has been read and loved by us. We only recommend and sell books we love. We are looking for meaning.

Words and meaning

A friend’s  grandsons are being raised to speak three languages. They will hear, speak and read for meaning in these languages. My nephews are fluent in Japanese and English.

SCL Bookwagon

   Bookwagon family readers

A difficult part of raising bi- lingual or tri-lingual families is unravelling the nuances of individual languages. A basic example of this is in national humours. Another is gestures. When we work to acquire another language we are looking for meaning beyond the words and  phrases alone.

ESOL/ EAL experts recommend families speak and read to their children in the adults’ first language, but ‘share’, i.e., read books together, in the adults’ secondary languages.

Bookwagon is building a range of quality translated titles from around the world. The subtleties, subjects and construction of these works, even in translation, are different from English books. Reading translated books extends understanding for readers looking for meaning.

Across the oceans

Before an audience at the British library, children’s laureates Lauren Child and Sir Quentin Blake discussed how their different works hit problems in translation. Lauren Child shared the consternation of American publishers by ‘My Uncle is a Hunkle’.

“What’s a hunkle?” her publishers demanded.

“It’s word play,” she explained.

“Word play?”

Bookwagon Word Play

Looking for titles with determination

I am delighted when international titles we seek to share with our readers become available in Britain. Works by writers like Kate DiCamillo fly from the wagon into readers’ waiting hands. Recently, we’ve included unique early chapter/ graphic books by Canadian writer Ben Clanton- Narwhal Unicorn of the Sea!

Minh Lê and Dan Santat collaborated to form a glorious picture book about characters looking for meaning in their relationship in Drawn Together

Polly Horvath wrote ‘Everything You Need on a Waffle‘, a favourite title I read to classes. It is unavailable in Britain. I am very happy to welcome her most recent title, The Night Garden. The setting is Sooke, a little known, hidden treasure on Vancouver Island. We holidayed there before the giddy days of Bookwagon.

Bookwagon an international books' selection

 Some recent international titles

Further looking for meaning

Customers ask how the Bookwagon team maintain our pledge to sell books we’ve read and loved only. We are committed to knowing every book we sell. It means we recommend children’s books for  your children confidently in person, by gift and online. It means that I am writing in a room covered in books seeking my readership. What bliss! Check out the latest titles rolling off this reader’s lap and onto a page soon!

Happy reading!

RIP- Helen Mayho, Granny Bookwagon

 

 

 

 

 

 

We read every book we sell

We read every book we sell

Do you know we read every book we sell? Every word written about every book we sell is from our own reading experience? This means that families and schools seeking recommendations can depend on Bookwagon. We are able to offer a selection of books confidently because we know every book we stock.

Bookwagon reading family

School grandparents’ day

What we do

We read every book we sell. If we like a book, we write about it. We have an enormous TBR (to be read) pile. Some very popular titles are on our TBR pile. There is greater attention paid to writers/ picture book makers of very popular books, so we are not unduly concerned.  What about the new writer or picture book maker? The creator who’s taken a punt on something different? A writer or picture book maker from another country, or a title from a smaller publishing house, that is less visible.

Bookwagon Jump!

        Jump (Gecko Press)

 How we find our books

I search for books constantly. Currently I am compiling unique book lists for two schools where we are contracted as reading consultants. I think about our gift book readers. Each has a list where I note possible titles constantly, seeking to fit each reader’s preference and need.

Bookwagon work station

     Bookwagon HQ + assistant

A discovery

I read lists from international press. That’s how I discovered Martin Brown, best known as the artist for ‘Horrible Histories’. Martin Brown’s Lesser Spotted Animals  received two starred American national book of the year reviews at the conclusion of 2017.  After reading and describing the title for Bookwagon, I  recommended and sold it there, through gift book subscription and at popup school book fairs. It was a privilege to be the bookseller that supported Martin Brown’s visit to a Hampshire primary school ahead of the Spring school holidays as he launched Martin Brown’s Lesser Spotted Animals 2.

Bookwagon Martin Brown

Martin Brown, signing, school visit

Bookwagon Lesser Spotted Animals 2

Martin Brown’s Lesser Spotted Animals 2

Readers

Bookwagon readers are a huge source of information. This week, I received a letter from one of our gift book subscribers. This month her gift book subscription choice was The Midnight Hour. She was exultant. For two pages she described the story and contemplated the advantages of each Pooka. (I choose Hare, incidentally.)

Bookwagon The Midnight Hour

The Midnight Hour- Benjamin Read & Laura Trinder

This child is a reader. Books entertain, extend and enthral her. She loves the opportunity to explore new worlds. This reader seeks ‘forever’ books to sustain and delight.

Bookwagon reader's letter

   A letter from a reader

From afar

I learned of adventure writer Dan Smith through my godson who received Boy X for his ninth birthday. This reader told me that Bookwagon must track down Dan Smith’s books. We have loved reading Dan Smith consequently, with Mr Bookwagon recently describing She Wolf. 

Bookwagon She Wolf cover image

     She Wolf- Dan Smith

This is that godson reading ‘She Wolf‘ on Easter Sunday:-

Bookwagon Easter reader

Bookwagon Easter Sunday reader

Press far and wide

I seek information about new releases, or titles of interest, through the global press, book fairs, publishing houses, certain social media sources and international book awards. We read every book we sell. It is imperative to be able to offer the broadest range of quality children’s titles.

Bookwagon Blackbird Fly

Blackbird Fly- Erin Entrada Kelly

I discovered Erin Entrada Kelly and Dan Santat through the American Library Association Awards. Titles such as Blackbird Fly and After the Fall are a privilege to know and recommend.

Bookwagon After the Fall

      After the Fall- Dan Santat

Writers and picture book makers

Discovering a great writer and picture book maker encourages us to seek other titles they have created. Have You Seen My Blankie? is an original, rhyming reading journey. I sought to read other works by Lucy Rowland, thereafter.  The Knight Who Said, “NO!” and Little Red Reading Hood have been ideal additions to our Bookwagon.

Bookwagon Have You Seen My Blankie?

 Have You Seen Blankie?- Lucy Rowland

Cath Howe’s stirring Ella on the Outside has been a favourite Bookwagon reading selection. I read her follow-up Not My Fault in one sitting. Then I described it for our readers, for we read every book we sell.

Bookwagon Not My Fault

 Not My Fault- Cath Howe

Why do we read every book we sell?

I was frequently asked for reading recommendations by children, colleagues and parents when I taught. This counsel increased over the years. I was aware parents and colleagues were time poor, although we were information saturated. We started at a time in which numbers of public libraries, school libraries and independent bookshops are in decline. Public media seldom gives a platform to children’s literature despite its importance to our society.

Bookwagon school event, Sam Usher

Sam Usher, Bookwagon school event

We needed to hit the ground running in creating Bookwagon. To that end, we have not formed a physical shop- yet. We did not want to have to offer coffee, cake, gifts and stationery to enable survival. Bookwagon is focused on children’s books alone. We offer recommendations based on the fact we read every book we sell. I have a long experience and specialism in reading and children’s literature. Bookwagon recommendations are available immediately whether online, through personal contact or popup event.

Bookwagon stall

  Bookwagon makes a stand

A Golden Age of Children’s Literature

I listened to a recent broadcast focused upon children’s literature-  BBC Radio 4 Front Row Golden Age of Children’s Books? A speaker suggested ‘There are better books being published than at any other time.’ I agree. There is a greater choice and higher quality of titles. However, ‘We are drowning out fine children’s books’.  A proliferation of overly familiar titles, authors and themes, a ready availability of cheap, disposable books result in better books not reaching their deserved reading audience.

Bookwagon gift reader

      A Bookwagon reader

Bookwagon is tiny and new. However we are determined to do our best to bring good books to readers. We read every book we sell, proudly.

Happy reading